WHAT I SURF
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WHAT I SURF  –  Peter Meldrum | semi-retired Cartoonist, around 60, 85kg approx., Level – competent, has trouble on the take-off.

Peter normally surfs a board around 6’6 as an all-rounder or a 6’2 fish style board in small waves.
Pete is recovering from a shoulder injury and finds the smaller boards too hard to compete on at his home break.
So, while on the road back Pete has been surfing a Mollusc Robo at 7’2 21¼ 2 11/16 44.45 litres.
As opposed to 6’6 20  2 9/16 at 35.13 litres, obviously a big difference.

But he has been happy to go with this in the rehab stage and finds that even now after basically fully recovering he is still finding himself on the MR 7’2. Especially when the waves are fuller, real small, onshore, or bigger with a little more power.
The hardest thing about surfing a bigger board is acclimatising, getting used to the longer feel.

A big board is a big board and they are slower to respond thru turns.
So once you get used to this and wait in the turn and not force the turn, or rush it like on a smaller board and just let the rail do the work, you get more out of the experience and of course the wave count is up.

Pete on the 7’2 Mollusc Robo with FCS thruster medium size fins on a bigger day at the local break in Sydney.

Pete on the 7’2 Mollusc Robo with FCS thruster medium size fins on a bigger day at the local break in Sydney.

It is a good trick with a bigger board to surf smaller fins.
You don’t need all the fin area to the hold the board in like a smaller high performance board.
The longer rail will keep you in the water and smaller fins help to loosen the big board up.
The other thing you can do is place a smaller back fin in to also create a looser feel.

Pete in early and good glide across the wave face for down the line speed.

Pete in early and good glide across the wave face for down the line speed.

 

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